RON HENGGELER

September 21, 2017
A visit to the Legion of Honor to see Degas, Sarah Lucas, and two Egyptian mummies, Irethorrou and Hatason

 

Headstone and the burial place of Francisco, in the front yard

Busstop on Fulton at Masonic in San Francisco

Sarah Lucas: Good Muse

July 15, 2017 – September 17, 2017

Sarah Lucas has gained notoriety for creating sculptures and installations that showcase the innate crudeness of stereotypical conceptions of gender and sexuality. From the outset, Lucas has used self-portraiture to debunk conservative notions of femininity, adopting stances associated with male behavior that purposefully foster sexual ambiguity. Lucas’s penchant for androgyny has also filtered into her sculpture, with bodies that flaunt both male and female attitudes and attributes and deny any clear association with either. 

Margot, 2015

by Sarah Lucas

Michele, 1015

by Sarah Lucas

Pauline, 2015

by Sarah Lucas

 

Michele, 1015

by Sarah Lucas

INNAMEMORABILIAMUMBUM, 2016

by Sarah Lucas

INNAMEMORABILIAMUMBUM, 2016

by Sarah Lucas

Titti Doris, 2017

by Sarah Lucas

In conjunction with Auguste Rodin: The Centenary Installation, the Legion of Honor has invited Lucas to bring a contemporary perspective to our understanding and appreciation of Rodin. Purposefully confrontational in its allusions to sexual acts, both verbal and physical, her work highlights Rodin’s erotic side, albeit confronting his idealizing male gaze with work that takes a demonstrative stance against female objectification and for the empowerment of woman.

Titti Doris, 2017

by Sarah Lucas

Washing Machine Fried Egg, 2016

by Sarah Lucas

Detail of Washing Machine Fried Egg, 2016

by Sarah Lucas

Head of Pierre de Wiessant, ca. 1886

by Auguste Rodin

Titti Doris, 2017

by Sarah Lucas

 

Margot, 2015

by Sarah Lucas

Jubilee, 2017

by Sarah Lucas

Jubilee, 2017

by Sarah Lucas

The Three Shades, 1898

by Auguste Rodin

Tit Teddy (Gates of Hell), 2017

by Sarah Lucas

The Three Shades, 1898

by Auguste Rodin

Tit Teddy (Gates of Hell), 2017

by Sarah Lucas

Boar's Head tureen

England, ca. 1754

Chelsea Manufactory

by Sarah Lucas

by Sarah Lucas

Pauline, 2015

by Sarah Lucas

Christ at the Column, 1632

by Pieter Fransz, de Grebber

Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

June 24, 2017 – September 24, 2017

Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade features approximately 40 Impressionist paintings and pastels, including key works by Degas—many never before exhibited in the United States—as well as those by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Édouard Manet, Mary Cassatt, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and 40 exquisite examples of period hats.

Montmartre par Renault et Chateau (Montmartre by G. renault and H. Chateau), ca. 1897

by Maxime Dethomas

Woman Viewed from Behind (Visit to a Museum), ca. 1879-1885

by Egdar Degas

Best known for his depictions of Parisian dancers and laundresses, Edgar Degas (French, 1834-1917) was enthralled with another aspect of life in the French capital—high-fashion hats and the women who created them. The artist, invariably well-dressed and behatted himself, “dared to go into ecstasies in front of the milliners’ shops,” Paul Gauguin wrote of his lifelong friend.

from: Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

The Millinery Shop, ca. 1879-1886

by Edgar Degas

Degas’ fascination inspired a visually compelling and profoundly modern body of work that documents the lives of what one fashion writer of the day called “the aristocracy of the workwomen of Paris, the most elegant and distinguished.” Yet despite the importance of millinery within Degas’s oeuvre, there has been little discussion of its place in Impressionist iconography.

from: Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

The exhibition will be the first to examine the height of the millinery trade in Paris, from around 1875 to 1914, as reflected in the work of the Impressionists. At this time there were around 1,000 milliners working in what was then considered the fashion capital of the world.

from: Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

Woman With an Unbrella (Berthe Jeantaud), 1876

by Edgar Degas

 

At the Theatre: Woman Seated in the Balcony, ca. 1877-1880

by Edgar Degas

Mary Cassatt, ca. 1880-1884

by Edgar Degas

Woman With a Dog, ca. 1875-1880

by Edgar Degas

Young Girls Looking at an Album, ca. 1892

by Pierre Auguste Renoir

Head of Simone in a Green Bonnet with Wavy Brim (no.2), ca. 1904

by Mary Cassatt

Madame Guillemet, 1880

by Edouard Manet

Head of a Woman, ca. 1887-1890

by Edgar Degas

Head of a Woman, ca. 1887-1890

by Edgar Degas

Portrait of Mademoiselle Dubois, 1884

by Alfred Stevens

Portrait of Madame J (Young Woman in Black), 1883

by Mary Cassatt

The Milliners, ca. 1882-before 1905

by Edgar Degas

The Milliner, 1895-1900

by Frederico Zandomeneghi

 

The Milliners, 1898

by Edgar Degas

The Millinery Shop, ca. 1879-1886

by Edgar Degas

 

Degas Wearing a Hat, 1876

by Marcellin Desboutin

 

Old Woman, ca. 1618-1619

by Goerges de La Tour

Pauline, 2015

by Sarah Lucas

St. John the Baptist Preaching, ca. 1665

by Mattia Preti called Il Calabrese

Portrait of a Man, ca. 1540

Attributed to Lorenzo Lotto

The Future of the Past: Mummies and Medicine

May 14, 2016 – August 26, 2018

Ancient Egypt meets modern medicine in this exhibition that makes use of state-of-the-art scientific techniques to explore two of the Fine Arts Museums’ mummies. An interdisciplinary team of scientists, Egyptologists, physicians, and museum curators and conservators has learned more about how these embalmed individuals lived, died, and were prepared for eternity.

Text from: The Future of the Past: Mummies and Medicine

 

One of the mummies investigated is that of Irethorrou, a priest from an important family living in Akhmim in middle Egypt about 2,600 years ago. The Future of the Past includes information that has been gleaned about Irethorrou’s lifestyle, the society in which he lived, his religion, and the funerary beliefs of his time.

Text from: The Future of the Past: Mummies and Medicine

The second mummy, perhaps 500 years older, is that of a woman traditionally known as “Hatason.” Neither her mummy nor her coffin has fared as well as those of Irethorrou, and they present a stark contrast to Irethorrou’s perfectly preserved body.

Text from: The Future of the Past: Mummies and Medicine

Hatason

Hatason

 

Madonna and Child with Two Angels, ca. 1525

Studio of Pontormo

Martyrdom of Saint Bartolomeo, ca. 1660

by Luca Giordano

Jubilee, 2017

by Sarah Lucas

Lady Elizabeth Bingham, 1810

by Joseph Nollekens

Mary Queen of Scots, ca. 1860-1869

by Albert-Ernest Carrier-Belleuse

The Assuaging of the Waters, 1840

by John Martin

Albert Ladovici (1820-1894), 1873

by Aime-Jules Dalou

The Impresario, 1877

by Edgar Degas

 

Washing Machine Fried Egg, 2016

by Sarah Lucas

Lincoln Park Golf Course surrounding the Legion of Honor in San Francisco

(Fort Miley VA Medical Center in the background)

Lincoln Park Golf Course surrounding the Legion of Honor in San Francisco

(Fort Miley VA Medical Center in the background)

Lincoln Park Golf Course surrounding the Legion of Honor in San Francisco

Lincoln Park Golf Course surrounding the Legion of Honor in San Francisco

 

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